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Hungry Jacks Kids Club Meal (Simpsons) TV ad [ 100% ]

27 January 2010

The OPC complained that an ad for Hungry Jack’s Kids Club Meals promoting free Simpsons couch toys with meals breached the ‘Quick Service Restaurant Initiative for Responsible Advertising and Marketing to Children’ (QSRI) because the ad was directed to children, and the advertised meal did not meet the QSRI nutrition criteria. The OPC noted that the Kids Club Meal had not changed since it was held by the ASB to breach the QSRI nutrition criteria. The OPC also complained that the ad breached the ‘premium’s and ‘personalities/characters’ clauses of the QSRI because it promoted free toys and featured licensed characters.

Hungry Jack’s Kids Club Meal and McDonald’s Happy Meal [ 83% ]

19 February 2010

The OPC complained that ads for McDonalds Happy Meals and Hungry Jack's Kids Club Meals were broadcast during C and P programs (Totally Wild) and featured premiums (free toys) in breach of the Children's Television Standards.

The McDonalds 'Stuff to Know' ad for Happy Meals promoted Ben 10 Alien Force Action Band toys and Little Miss Pet Shop Accessory Kits with meals. The Hungry Jack's ad for its Kids Club Meals promoted free Simpsons couch toys with meals.

Hungry Jack's website [ 77% ]

29 August 2011

The OPC complained that the promotion of the Hungry Jack's Kids Club and meals on the Hungry Jack's website, www.hungryjacks.com.au, breached the Quick Service Restaurant Industry Initiative for Responsible Advertising and Marketing to Children (QSRII) because the website is directed to children and meals depicted on the website do not meet the QSRII nutrition criteria.

Hungry Jack’s Kids Club Meal (SpongeBob Square Pants) TV ad [ 71% ]

6 November 2009

The OPC complained that an ad for Hungry Jack’s Kids Club Meals, featuring Sponge Bob Square Pants characters and promoting free Sponge Bob Square Pants toys with meals, breached the ‘Quick Service Restaurant Initiative for Responsible Advertising and Marketing to Children’ (QSRI) because the ad was directed to children, and the advertised meal did not meet the QSRI nutrition criteria. The OPC also complained that the ad breached the ‘premiums’ and ‘personalities/characters’ clauses of the QSRI because it promoted free toys, and featured licensed characters.

Hungry Jack’s Kids Club Meals - Golden Compass TV ad [ 70% ]

14 February 2008

The OPC complained that the ad breached the premium provision of the AANA Food Code because it was directed to children and promoted free Golden Compass animal character toys with Kids Club Meals, and that it breached the pester power provision of the Code because it encouraged children to pester parents to take them to Hungry Jack's in order to buy the meal with the toys.

Streets Paddle Pop TV ad [ 12% ]

10 February 2010

The OPC complained that a Streets Paddle Pops ad featured a premium (competition to win toys and holidays) and was likely to have been broadcast during C and P programs in breach of the Children's Television Standards (it was frequently broadcast in the mornings between 7am and 12 pm, including during school holidays).

The ad promoted a competition to win prizes by buying Paddle Pops and matching prize codes on Paddle Pops sticks. A voice-over spoken in a young child's voice encouraged children to ‘get licking' to win the prizes and one million free Paddle Pops on offer.

OPC encourages fast food chains to follow KFC's example [ 5% ]

25 August 2011

Today’s announcement by KFC Australia that it will no longer provide toys with children’s meals has been welcomed by the Obesity Policy Coalition (OPC), who urged other fast food companies to follow suit.