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Total 158 articles in this section.
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Junk food advertising rules are a pantomime [ 66% ]

10 May 2011

Self-regulation has failed to reduce children's exposure to unhealthy food advertising, and comprehensive legislation to restrict the range of marketing techniques used by companies to target children is needed.

Policy brief: Food advertising voluntary codes [ 66% ]

The food industry’s voluntary advertising codes fail to protect children from exposure to unhealthy food advertising. The codes do not apply to the highest rating children’s programs, do not cover all forms of promotion, do not apply to all food advertisers, and contain unclear and inadequate nutrition criteria. Compliance with the codes is not monitored, there are no sanctions for breaches, and provisions of the codes are narrowly interpreted by the Advertising Standards Board. Legislation is needed to protect children from the detrimental effects of unhealthy food advertising.

Exposing the Charade report [ 65% ]

12 November 2012

The Obesity Policy Coalition has released one of the most comprehensive investigations into Australia's self-regulatory system for food marketing ever undertaken.

Detailed analysis illustrates how the advertising codes that claim to protect children from junk food advertising have resolutely failed. Further, the report highlights the litany of loopholes being used by the processed food industry to continue to promote their products despite childhood obesity sitting at record levels. 

Read the report.  

See the Obesity Policy Coalition's media release.

 

Parents duped by sports star endorsement of junk food [ 64% ]

15 February 2011

Endorsements by well-known sports personalities and selective nutrition claims on food packaging influence parents to buy unhealthy food for their children, according to Cancer Council Victoria’s new study.

[ 64% ]

The Obesity Policy Coalition is concerned about the increasing levels of overweight and obesity, particularly in Australian children. Indications are that overweight and obesity among children is not merely increasing but accelerating.

Complaints [ 63% ]

The Obesity Policy Coalition makes complaints to regulatory and self-regulatory agencies about issues such as food marketing to children.

Oreos TV Ad 2 [ 62% ]

11 May 2011

The OPC complained that an advertisement for Kraft Oreos biscuits, which featured a child and toddler drinking milk and dunking their Oreos cookies, breached the RCMI because it was directed primarily to children, and Oreos are not a healthy dietary choice. The advertisement was also broadcast during programs/movies directed primarily to children (Ice Age, Alvin and the Chipmunks and Bee Movie).

Oreos TV Ad [ 61% ]

9 August 2010

The OPC complained that an ad for Kraft Oreos biscuits, which featured two boys in a schoolyard, who play a game involving pulling apart Oreos and nominating the girl the other boy will have to marry, breached the RCMI because it was directed primarily to children, and Oreos are not a healthy dietary choice.

Who we are [ 61% ]

The Obesity Policy Coalition is concerned about the increasing levels of overweight and obesity, particularly in Australian children.

Opinion piece to The Age: World Consumer Rights Day [ 61% ]

15 March 2008

Opinion piece to The Age

Total 158 articles in this section.
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