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Total 160 articles in this section.
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Snickers, Mars Bar, Twix and Coca-Cola TV ads shown during The Simpsons [ 44% ]

6 October 2010

The OPC complained that ads for Snickers (American football and Betty White), Mars Bars (sports ball give-away), Coca-Cola (men watching foorball) and Twix (Commonwealth Games) breached the RCMI because they were broadcast during the Simpsons (among the top 10 highest rating shows for children) and because the products do not represent healthy dietary choices.

See Snickers complaint here

See Mars Bar complaint here

See Coca-Cola complaint here

See Twix complaint here

Hungry Jacks Kids Club Meal (Simpsons) TV ad [ 44% ]

27 January 2010

The OPC complained that an ad for Hungry Jack’s Kids Club Meals promoting free Simpsons couch toys with meals breached the ‘Quick Service Restaurant Initiative for Responsible Advertising and Marketing to Children’ (QSRI) because the ad was directed to children, and the advertised meal did not meet the QSRI nutrition criteria. The OPC noted that the Kids Club Meal had not changed since it was held by the ASB to breach the QSRI nutrition criteria. The OPC also complained that the ad breached the ‘premium’s and ‘personalities/characters’ clauses of the QSRI because it promoted free toys and featured licensed characters.

Policy brief: International laws restricting food advertising [ 44% ]

Food advertising to children is subject to legislative restrictions in a number of countries. While some countries (Sweden and Norway) prohibit all advertising directed to children, others (United Kingdom and South Korea) aim to reduce the exposure of children to unhealthy food advertising and the marketing techniques most commonly used to target children. In France, health messages must be included in unhealthy food advertisements. International health agencies have released recommendations to encourage countries to develop stronger restrictions on unhealthy food advertising to children.

Hungry Jack’s Kids Club Meal (SpongeBob Square Pants) TV ad [ 44% ]

6 November 2009

The OPC complained that an ad for Hungry Jack’s Kids Club Meals, featuring Sponge Bob Square Pants characters and promoting free Sponge Bob Square Pants toys with meals, breached the ‘Quick Service Restaurant Initiative for Responsible Advertising and Marketing to Children’ (QSRI) because the ad was directed to children, and the advertised meal did not meet the QSRI nutrition criteria. The OPC also complained that the ad breached the ‘premiums’ and ‘personalities/characters’ clauses of the QSRI because it promoted free toys, and featured licensed characters.

Junk food advertising to kids is rife [ 44% ]

19 January 2011

A report released by the Australian Food and Grocery Council (AFGC) today highlights how ineffective self-regulation has been in decreasing children's exposure to junk food advertising.

Chicken Treat TV ad [ 43% ]

28 January 2011


The OPC complained that the Chicken Treat TV ad breached the Quick Service Restaurant Initiative for Responsible Advertising and Marketing to Children’ (QSRI) because the ad was directed to children, and the advertised meal did not meet the QSRI nutrition criteria’. The advertisement featured a fun animated chicken promoting two chicken and chips meals for $10.

OPC urges Senate to support junk ad bill [ 43% ]

21 November 2011

The Obesity Policy Coalition (OPC) has urged all Federal MPs to support a Bill to be introduced into the Senate tomorrow to protect children from junk food advertising.

Policy brief: Food advertising regulation in Australia [ 43% ]

Food advertising in Australia is regulated under a complex mix of statutory regulations and co- and self- regulatory codes. These regulations and codes are inadequate to protect children from unhealthy food advertising; they do not restrict the volume of unhealthy food advertising that children are exposed to, nor do they adequately restrict the marketing techniques most commonly used to target children. There are also significant deficiencies in the administration and enforcement of the self-regulatory codes. Comprehensive legislation restricting unhealthy food advertising to children is urgently required. 

Happy Meal website [ 43% ]

18 March 2011

The OPC complained that the McDonald's Happy Meal website, http://www.happymeal.com.au/, breached the Quick Service Restaurant Industry Initiative for Responsible Advertising and Marketing to Children (QSRII) because the website is directed to children and Happy Meals do not meet the QSRII nutrition criteria.

Sports star endorsement works a treat on junk food packaging [ 42% ]

28 May 2013

Claims such as 'Good source of calcium and protein' and sports star endorsements on food packaging do influence children's choices.

Total 160 articles in this section.
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