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Free TV Australia's review of the Commercial Television Industry Code of Practice [ 40% ]

1 April 2015

The OPC's submission focuses upon the role that the Commercial Television Industry Code of Practice (CTICP) should play in restricting unhealthy food advertising to children.

In particular, it expresses concern about Free TV Australia's proposal to remove the only clauses in the CTICP that relate to unhealthy food advertising to children. It submits that at the very least, the current restrictions that apply to unhealthy food advertising to children should be retained and strengthened. Preferably, and to meaningfully reduce children's exposure to unhealthy food advertising, the OPC proposes that comprehensive amendments should be made to address the volume of unhealthy food advertising on television and the marketing techniques most commonly used to reach children.

If a co-regulatory approach capable of protecting children from this type of advertising cannot be achieved, a regulatory approach will be required.

Free TV Australia released its new Commercial Television Industry Code of Practice on 10 November 2015, which removed the clauses relating to unhealthy food advertising to children. The new code is available here

McDonald's Happy Meal TV ads [ 38% ]

6 November 2009

The OPC complained that McDonald’s ‘Box of Fun’ and ‘Cartoon Network’ TV ads for Happy Meals breached the QSRI because they were directed to children, and advertised products that did not meet the QSRI nutrition criteria (the particular products contained in the Happy Meals could not be identified from the ad, and therefore could not be said to meet the QSRI nutrition criteria). The OPC also complained that the ‘Cartoon Network’ ad also breached the premium clause of the QSRI because it advertised free toys with Happy Meals.

Hungry Jack’s Kids Club Meals - Golden Compass TV ad [ 38% ]

14 February 2008

The OPC complained that the ad breached the premium provision of the AANA Food Code because it was directed to children and promoted free Golden Compass animal character toys with Kids Club Meals, and that it breached the pester power provision of the Code because it encouraged children to pester parents to take them to Hungry Jack's in order to buy the meal with the toys.

Dept of Communication's review of Australian Communications & Media Authority [ 37% ]

13 August 2015

 

The OPC's submission focuses upon the role the Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA), or any new broadcasting agency, should play in protecting children from unhealthy food advertising that may be harmful to them.

Letter to The Sunday Age [ 35% ]

30 March 2008

Letter to The Sunday Age

Public supports tougher regulation of unhealthy food advertising [ 32% ]

16 November 2011

93% of South Australians agree the time has come to put a stop to unhealthy food producers from targeting kids through glitzy television ads and marketing ploys.

Letter to The Australian: Parents need support [ 31% ]

19 May 2008

Letter to The Australian

Letter to The Australian [ 31% ]

13 August 2009

Letter to The Australian

Total 158 articles in this section.
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