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Policy brief: Mandatory kilojoule labelling in chain food outlets in Australia [ 22% ]

 

Poor diets and high body mass index are leading contributors to the burden of chronic disease in Australia. There is evidence that providing clear kilojoule information at the point of sale in chain food outlets, along with public education, causes consumers to purchase fewer kilojoules overall.

This policy brief explores evidence of the impact of clear chain fast food menu labelling on diet, both in Australia and internationally and considers legislative actions undertaken in Australia.

FSANZ Labelling Review Recommendation 17: Per serving declarations in nutrition information panel [ 21% ]

1 February 2015

 

The OPC's submission, regarding the proposal to make the inclusion of 'per serve' information within Nutrition Information Panels (NIP) on packaged foods optional in Australia, focused on the need for FSANZ to:

  • Ensure that all food labelling reforms are undertaken within the context of ongoing efforts to improve the utility of food labels for Australian consumers by promoting use of the Health Star Rating System (HSRS)
  • Address the misleading application of industry-determined serving sizes
  • Ensure any reforms to the NIPs promote widespread adoption of the HSRS

 

 

 

Policy brief: The health star rating food labelling system [ 19% ]

The Health Star Rating System (HSRS) is a front-of-pack labelling system which rates the healthiness of products using a 5-star scale. In June 2014, State and Federal ministers voted in support of the HSRS, which was developed by government, industry, public health and consumer groups.

The HSRS is currently being voluntarily implemented. The HSRS will benefit consumers by providing clear, interpretive front-of-pack labels to facilitate healthier food choices.

Health groups release landmark blueprint to tackle key driver of childhood obesity [ 9% ]

9 May 2011

The Obesity Policy Coalition has today released the first Australian plan for legislation that offers real protection for children from unhealthy food advertising – one of the key drivers of childhood obesity.

4 in 5 Victorians support kilojoules on the menu: survey shows [ 9% ]

10 February 2017

Leading health organisations have today congratulated the Victorian Government for passing legislation to make kilojoule labelling on menus mandatory, as new data shows the majority of Victorians support the move, along with an education campaign.

KJs on the menu: a healthy step for Victorians [ 8% ]

7 April 2016

The Obesity Policy Coalition has welcomed the Victorian Government's announcement this morning that it will implement mandatory kilojoule labelling in chain fast food outlets and supermarkets across the state.

New WHO guidelines should be a call to industry to stop sugarcoating kids’ foods [ 8% ]

6 March 2014

Australia needs to take action in response to new World Health Organization guidelines around sugar consumption, according to a coalition of leading health organisations, the Obesity Policy Coalition.

Letter to The Australian [ 8% ]

13 August 2009

Letter to The Australian

Health Star Rating Call on Food Ministers [ 8% ]

26 June 2014

The Public Health Association of Australia (PHAA) and the Obesity Policy Coalition have called on Ministers at the Food Ministers’ Forum[1] tomorrow to support the Health Star Rating system and to re-establish the website that facilitates the new Health Star Rating on packaged food.

Australia should follow UK with 20% sugary drinks tax [ 8% ]

17 March 2016

The Federal Government should implement a 20% tax on sugary drinks to improve the health of Australians and reduce the burden of chronic disease, according to Jane Martin, Executive Manager, Obesity Policy Coalition.

Total 41 articles in this section.
Pages: << Previous 1 . [2] . 3 . 4 . 5 Next >>