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Total 171 articles in this section.
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Letter for The Sunday Age - 30 March 2008 [ 16% ]

On 23 March 2008, The Sunday Age published an opinion piece by Chris Berg from the Institute of Public Affairs, titled 'Nanny state ad bans won't stop kids liking junk food. The belief that free will is crushed by advertising is nonsense.' The OPC sent the following letter in response.

Kellogg’s LCM Bars TV ad [ 16% ]

24 December 2009

The OPC complained that an ad for Kellogg's LCM bars was directed to children and LCMs are not a healthy snack for children. The ad features primary school-aged children in a schoolyard trying to guess the flavour of an LCM bar. It shows excited children flocking to betting stations to place their bets, and cheering when a boy finally guesses the correct flavour. The ad depicts LCM bars as causing great excitement among young children, and as attracting the attention and envy of a child’s peers.

Happy Meal website [ 16% ]

18 March 2011

The OPC complained that the McDonald's Happy Meal website, http://www.happymeal.com.au/, breached the Quick Service Restaurant Industry Initiative for Responsible Advertising and Marketing to Children (QSRII) because the website is directed to children and Happy Meals do not meet the QSRII nutrition criteria.

Hungry Jacks Kids Club Meal (Simpsons) TV ad [ 16% ]

27 January 2010

The OPC complained that an ad for Hungry Jack’s Kids Club Meals promoting free Simpsons couch toys with meals breached the ‘Quick Service Restaurant Initiative for Responsible Advertising and Marketing to Children’ (QSRI) because the ad was directed to children, and the advertised meal did not meet the QSRI nutrition criteria. The OPC noted that the Kids Club Meal had not changed since it was held by the ASB to breach the QSRI nutrition criteria. The OPC also complained that the ad breached the ‘premium’s and ‘personalities/characters’ clauses of the QSRI because it promoted free toys and featured licensed characters.

Hungry Jack's website [ 16% ]

29 August 2011

The OPC complained that the promotion of the Hungry Jack's Kids Club and meals on the Hungry Jack's website, www.hungryjacks.com.au, breached the Quick Service Restaurant Industry Initiative for Responsible Advertising and Marketing to Children (QSRII) because the website is directed to children and meals depicted on the website do not meet the QSRII nutrition criteria.

McDonald's Happy Meal TV ads [ 16% ]

6 November 2009

The OPC complained that McDonald’s ‘Box of Fun’ and ‘Cartoon Network’ TV ads for Happy Meals breached the QSRI because they were directed to children, and advertised products that did not meet the QSRI nutrition criteria (the particular products contained in the Happy Meals could not be identified from the ad, and therefore could not be said to meet the QSRI nutrition criteria). The OPC also complained that the ‘Cartoon Network’ ad also breached the premium clause of the QSRI because it advertised free toys with Happy Meals.

Hungry Jack’s Kids Club Meal (SpongeBob Square Pants) TV ad [ 16% ]

6 November 2009

The OPC complained that an ad for Hungry Jack’s Kids Club Meals, featuring Sponge Bob Square Pants characters and promoting free Sponge Bob Square Pants toys with meals, breached the ‘Quick Service Restaurant Initiative for Responsible Advertising and Marketing to Children’ (QSRI) because the ad was directed to children, and the advertised meal did not meet the QSRI nutrition criteria. The OPC also complained that the ad breached the ‘premiums’ and ‘personalities/characters’ clauses of the QSRI because it promoted free toys, and featured licensed characters.

Kraft Chips Ahoy TV ad [ 15% ]

13 July 2011

The OPC complained that the Kraft's Chips Ahoy TV ad breached the Responsible Children's Marketing Initiative (RCMI) because the advertisement was directed to children, was broadcast during programs/movies directed to children (Happy Feet, Power Ranges and Fantastic Four) and because Chips Ahoy do not represent a healthy dietary choice consistent with established scientific or Australian government standards.

The advertisement featured animated cookies driving a car and singing.

Qld Gov Fast Choices kilojoule menu labelling [ 15% ]

13 October 2015

 

The OPC's submission supports the Queensland government's proposal for legislation to require kilojoule labelling on fast food menus. It also identifies how the proposed legislation could be strengthened and encourages the QLD government to draw upon the learnings from menu labelling schemes in NSW, SA and the ACT, as well as the voluntary Health Star Rating system applicable to packaged foods across Australia. 

The Health Legislation Amendment Bill 2015 was introduced into the Queensland Parliament on 12 November 2015. As much of the detail of the scheme will be prescribed by regulation, a draft of the Food Amendment Regulation and Explanatory Notes was also tabled in Parliament. These instruments largely reflected the proposal outlined in the consultation paper but also include changes to the application of the legislation to standard food items in supermarkets and trial products. Penalties for non-compliance were also increased to ensure consistency with NSW and ACT legislation.

Total 171 articles in this section.
Pages: << Previous 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . 5 . 6 . 7 . 8 . 9 . 10 . 11 . [12] . 13 . 14 . 15 . 16 . 17 . 18 Next >>