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Total 88 articles in this section.
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Hungry Jack's website [ 19% ]

29 August 2011

The OPC complained that the promotion of the Hungry Jack's Kids Club and meals on the Hungry Jack's website, www.hungryjacks.com.au, breached the Quick Service Restaurant Industry Initiative for Responsible Advertising and Marketing to Children (QSRII) because the website is directed to children and meals depicted on the website do not meet the QSRII nutrition criteria.

Complaints [ 19% ]

The Obesity Policy Coalition makes complaints to regulatory and self-regulatory agencies about issues such as food marketing to children.

Hungry Jacks Kids Club Meal (Simpsons) TV ad [ 19% ]

27 January 2010

The OPC complained that an ad for Hungry Jack’s Kids Club Meals promoting free Simpsons couch toys with meals breached the ‘Quick Service Restaurant Initiative for Responsible Advertising and Marketing to Children’ (QSRI) because the ad was directed to children, and the advertised meal did not meet the QSRI nutrition criteria. The OPC noted that the Kids Club Meal had not changed since it was held by the ASB to breach the QSRI nutrition criteria. The OPC also complained that the ad breached the ‘premium’s and ‘personalities/characters’ clauses of the QSRI because it promoted free toys and featured licensed characters.

McDonald's Happy Meal TV ads [ 19% ]

6 November 2009

The OPC complained that McDonald’s ‘Box of Fun’ and ‘Cartoon Network’ TV ads for Happy Meals breached the QSRI because they were directed to children, and advertised products that did not meet the QSRI nutrition criteria (the particular products contained in the Happy Meals could not be identified from the ad, and therefore could not be said to meet the QSRI nutrition criteria). The OPC also complained that the ‘Cartoon Network’ ad also breached the premium clause of the QSRI because it advertised free toys with Happy Meals.

Hungry Jack’s Kids Club Meal (SpongeBob Square Pants) TV ad [ 19% ]

6 November 2009

The OPC complained that an ad for Hungry Jack’s Kids Club Meals, featuring Sponge Bob Square Pants characters and promoting free Sponge Bob Square Pants toys with meals, breached the ‘Quick Service Restaurant Initiative for Responsible Advertising and Marketing to Children’ (QSRI) because the ad was directed to children, and the advertised meal did not meet the QSRI nutrition criteria. The OPC also complained that the ad breached the ‘premiums’ and ‘personalities/characters’ clauses of the QSRI because it promoted free toys, and featured licensed characters.

On the menu for next Vic Govt: Better fast food labelling, less junk in kids’ sport & beefed up planning laws [ 19% ]

18 July 2014

The Obesity Policy Coalition today called on all Victorian political parties to commit to taking action towards stemming the burden of lifestyle-related chronic disease in Victorian communities with the launch of its 2014 state election policy platform Next Steps: building on the prevention system to address overweight and obesity in Victoria.

Uncle Toby’s Roll-Ups ‘Fruba News’ email and website [ 19% ]

18 May 2007

Uncle Tobys sent an email newsletter promoting Roll-Ups to children who had registered on the Roll-Ups ‘Frubalia' website. The newsletter and website told children to 'ask mum or dad' to buy Roll-Ups to enter competition to win prizes, including a Playstation, Sony camera and iPod.

The OPC complained to the ASB that the email and website breached clauses 3.5 (pester power) and 3.7 (premiums) of the AANA Food Code (because they told children to ask their parents to buy the product, and because they were dominated by a premium offer (entry to the competition and chance to win prizes).

Policy brief: Food advertising regulation in Australia [ 19% ]

Food advertising in Australia is regulated under a complex mix of statutory regulations and co- and self- regulatory codes. These regulations and codes are inadequate to protect children from unhealthy food advertising; they do not restrict the volume of unhealthy food advertising that children are exposed to, nor do they adequately restrict the marketing techniques most commonly used to target children. There are also significant deficiencies in the administration and enforcement of the self-regulatory codes. Comprehensive legislation restricting unhealthy food advertising to children is urgently required. 

Policy brief: Food advertising to children [ 19% ]

There is substantial evidence that food and beverage advertising influences the types of foods children desire, demand and consume. Advertising of unhealthy food to children also undermines healthy eating messages from parents, schools and government, affects children’s ability to establish healthy eating patterns, and is likely to contribute to overweight and obesity in children.

The Obesity Policy Coalition recommends that legislation should be introduced (by federal and/or state governments) to prohibit television advertising of unhealthy food on television at times when a significant number of children are likely to be watching - on weekdays from 6–9am and 4–9 pm, and on weekends and school holidays from 6am–12pm and 4–9pm.

Legislation should also prohibit all other forms of promotion of unhealthy food to children, including via print, radio, internet, cinema, outdoor media, direct marketing (email, SMS or direct mail), product packaging, or point of sale promotions.

Letter to The Sunday Age [ 18% ]

30 March 2008

Letter to The Sunday Age

Total 88 articles in this section.
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