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4 in 5 Victorians support kilojoules on the menu: survey shows [ 27% ]

10 February 2017

Leading health organisations have today congratulated the Victorian Government for passing legislation to make kilojoule labelling on menus mandatory, as new data shows the majority of Victorians support the move, along with an education campaign.

Letter to The Sunday Age [ 26% ]

30 March 2008

Letter to The Sunday Age

Nestle Milky Bar Kids website [ 24% ]

27 July 2011

The OPC complained that the Nestle Milky Bar Kid competition website, at www.milkybar.com.au, breached the Australian Association of National Advertisers' (AANA) Food Code as it was contrary to prevailing community standards and undermined the importance of healthy diets. Recognising that the Responsible Children's Marketing Initiative (RCMI) does not apply to company owned websites, the OPC nevertheless asked the ASB to encourage Nestle to cease promoting Milky Bars directly to children and to withdraw the website.   

The website promoted the search for the new "Milky Bar Kid" competition. If featured young contenders and encouraged children to vote for their favourites. It also featured fun activities for children and promoted milky bars.

Hog's Breath website [ 24% ]

27 July 2011

The OPC complained that a Hog's Breath website, www.hogsbreath.com.au breached the Australian Association of National Advertisers' (AANA) Food Code as it is contrary to prevailing community standards on advertising unhealthy food to children, and undermines the importance of healthy diets.

The website features an animated hog that promotes unhealthy foods, including burgers, fries and soft drinks to children. It also features children's games and images to download and colour in.

Hog's Breath TV ad [ 24% ]

27 July 2011

The OPC complained that a Hog's Breath TV ad breached the Australian Association of National Advertisers' (AANA) Food Code as its content and placement during children's programs was contrary to prevailing community standards on unhealthy food advertising to children, and undermined the importance of healthy diets.

The advertisement featured a young girl and fun imagery and was broadcast during children's programs, including Totally Wild and Saturday Disney. The OPC asked the ASB and AANA to encourage Hog's Breath to become a signatory to the Quick Service Restaurant Initiative for Responsible Advertising and Marketing to Children and to cease advertising to children.

Streets Paddle Pop TV ad [ 24% ]

24 January 2012

The OPC complained that an ad for Streets Paddle Pops breached the Australian Food and Grocery Council’s ‘Responsible Children’s Marketing Initiative’ (RCMI) because Paddle Pop ice creams are not a healthy dietary choice, the advertisement was directed to children and the ad was shown during high rating programs for children, including Junior Masterchef – Disneyland, Home Alone and Home Alone 2.

The advertisement featured children's themes, animation and a voiceover targetted at children.

Hungry Jack's website [ 24% ]

29 August 2011

The OPC complained that the promotion of the Hungry Jack's Kids Club and meals on the Hungry Jack's website, www.hungryjacks.com.au, breached the Quick Service Restaurant Industry Initiative for Responsible Advertising and Marketing to Children (QSRII) because the website is directed to children and meals depicted on the website do not meet the QSRII nutrition criteria.

Happy Meal website [ 24% ]

18 March 2011

The OPC complained that the McDonald's Happy Meal website, http://www.happymeal.com.au/, breached the Quick Service Restaurant Industry Initiative for Responsible Advertising and Marketing to Children (QSRII) because the website is directed to children and Happy Meals do not meet the QSRII nutrition criteria.

Comprehensive Review of Food Labelling Law and Policy [ 24% ]

14 May 2010

The Comprehensive Review of Food Labelling Law and Policy (2011) was undertaken at the request of the Australian Ministerial Council, with the agreement of the Council of Australian Governments.

The OPC's first submission was in response to the Food Regulation Standing Committee's (FRSC) Consultation Paper for a Front of Pack Labelling Policy Guideline. The OPC recommended that the policy guideline should support the introduction of a uniform, mandatory and easy to use front of pack labelling system, preferably a traffic light labelling system.

The OPC's second submission was in response to the review panel's issues consultation paper. It outlined a number of key recommendations for changes to food labelling law and policy to encourage healthier patterns of eating in the Australian population, including:

  • Mandatory traffic light labelling on the front of food packages, in fast food outlets and in food retail outlets in public institutions (e.g. hospitals and schools)
  • Restrictions on use of nutrition claims (e.g. high fibre) in food advertising and on packaging to foods that meet general nutrition profile criteria (to ensure claims can only be made about foods that are healthy overall)
  • Requirements for disclosure of nutrition information in food advertisements
  • Establishment of a national food labelling enforcement authority
  • Development of overarching food labelling principles, and detailed food labelling interpretation guidelines

The Review Panel adopted a number of the OPC's recommendations for food labelling reforms (see Labelling Logic - Review of Food Labelling Law and Policy Report). In particular, the Review Panel recommended the introduction of a traffic light labelling system on the front of food packs and fast food menus (recommendations 50 - 54), the introduction of mandatory energy labelling on fast food menus and vending machines (recommendation 18),  requirement that all foods that make nutrition claims must meet general nutrition profile criteria (recommendation 20b) and establishment of a food labelling bureau (recommendation 57- 61).

The OPC's third submission was to inform the Commonwealth and State and Territory governments' response to the Labelling Logic report. It encouraged Australian governments to support the adoption of the recommendations in the report, particularly recommendations 50 - 54, 18, 20b and 57-61. It also made some additional suggestions to strengthen the effectiveness of, and compliance with, any traffic light labelling scheme.

Victorian Parliamentary Inquiry: Schools and Healthy Community Living [ 24% ]

31 July 2009

In 2009 a parliamentary inquiry was conducted into the potential for developing opportunities for schools to become a focus for promoting healthy community living. The purpose of the OPC's submission was to support the work of Kids - ‘Go for your life' (KGFYL) in schools, and KGFYL's submission to the inquiry.

Total 171 articles in this section.
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