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Total 171 articles in this section.
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Hungry Jack’s Kids Club Meals - Golden Compass TV ad [ 24% ]

14 February 2008

The OPC complained that the ad breached the premium provision of the AANA Food Code because it was directed to children and promoted free Golden Compass animal character toys with Kids Club Meals, and that it breached the pester power provision of the Code because it encouraged children to pester parents to take them to Hungry Jack's in order to buy the meal with the toys.

Kraft Chips Ahoy TV ad [ 24% ]

13 July 2011

The OPC complained that the Kraft's Chips Ahoy TV ad breached the Responsible Children's Marketing Initiative (RCMI) because the advertisement was directed to children, was broadcast during programs/movies directed to children (Happy Feet, Power Ranges and Fantastic Four) and because Chips Ahoy do not represent a healthy dietary choice consistent with established scientific or Australian government standards.

The advertisement featured animated cookies driving a car and singing.

Hungry Jack’s Kids Club Meal and McDonald’s Happy Meal [ 24% ]

19 February 2010

The OPC complained that ads for McDonalds Happy Meals and Hungry Jack's Kids Club Meals were broadcast during C and P programs (Totally Wild) and featured premiums (free toys) in breach of the Children's Television Standards.

The McDonalds 'Stuff to Know' ad for Happy Meals promoted Ben 10 Alien Force Action Band toys and Little Miss Pet Shop Accessory Kits with meals. The Hungry Jack's ad for its Kids Club Meals promoted free Simpsons couch toys with meals.

Victorian Government review of the Planning and Environment Act [ 24% ]

1 May 2009

The OPC's first submission to the consultation paper on modernising Victoria's Planning and Environment Act highlighted the role of planning and the environment in improving public health. It recommended amendments to the Act to require that health be recognized as an objective of planning, and that health be taken into consideration throughout the planning process.

The Victorian government has released response papers and a draft Planning and Environment Amendment (General) Bill. One of the proposed changes to the Act was to update the objectives of planning to include "secure a pleasant, efficient, healthy and safe working, living and recreational environment for all people in Victoria".

The OPC (together with SunSmart) provided a second submission to the Victorian government supporting the inclusion of "healthy" in the objectives of the amended Act, but suggested that healthy be given a broad meaning, recognizing the influence of the physical environment on physical and mental health and wellbeing.

Uncle Toby’s Roll-Ups ‘Fruba News’ email and website [ 24% ]

18 May 2007

Uncle Tobys sent an email newsletter promoting Roll-Ups to children who had registered on the Roll-Ups ‘Frubalia' website. The newsletter and website told children to 'ask mum or dad' to buy Roll-Ups to enter competition to win prizes, including a Playstation, Sony camera and iPod.

The OPC complained to the ASB that the email and website breached clauses 3.5 (pester power) and 3.7 (premiums) of the AANA Food Code (because they told children to ask their parents to buy the product, and because they were dominated by a premium offer (entry to the competition and chance to win prizes).

Snickers, Mars Bar, Twix and Coca-Cola TV ads shown during The Simpsons [ 24% ]

6 October 2010

The OPC complained that ads for Snickers (American football and Betty White), Mars Bars (sports ball give-away), Coca-Cola (men watching foorball) and Twix (Commonwealth Games) breached the RCMI because they were broadcast during the Simpsons (among the top 10 highest rating shows for children) and because the products do not represent healthy dietary choices.

See Snickers complaint here

See Mars Bar complaint here

See Coca-Cola complaint here

See Twix complaint here

Kellogg Nutri-Grain Iron Man TV ads [ 24% ]

16 June 2009

Kellogg’s Nutri-Grain ‘iron man’ TV ads featured a young man growing up into an iron man, and claimed that “as part of a balanced diet and regular exercise, Nutri-Grain has what it takes to help build your son into an Iron Man.” A further ad featured an iron man exercising in extreme conditions, and claimed that Nutri-Grain has “carbos for energy, protein for muscle development and calcium for bone strength...” The OPC complained that the ads were misleading and deceptive in breach of the AANA Food Code and the AANA Code of Ethics, because they created an overall impression that Nutri-Grain is healthy, good for, and beneficial to the active lifestyle of, children and young people (when in fact it is high in sugar and salt and low in fibre  and not a healthy breakfast cereal for children and young people).

Mainland Munchables TV advertisement [ 24% ]

4 July 2007

The TV ad for Mainland ‘Munchables' featured a mother nagging her son about the contents of his lunchbox and telling him not to eat any junk. The OPC and Young Media Australia made a joint complaint to the ASB about the ad on the grounds that it breached AANA Food Code because it negatively portrayed mothers' attempts to encourage their sons to eat healthily, in a way that aimed to undermine parents in their role of guiding diet and lifestyle choices.

Streets Paddle Pops website and TV ad [ 24% ]

10 February 2010

The OPC complained that the website and TV ad for the Streets Paddle Pop ‘Lick-a-prize’ promotion breached the AANA Food Code and Children’s Code because they featured a premium (the chance to win prizes), they were likely to mislead children to believe that the products being promoted were the prizes, they encouraged excessive consumption of Paddle Pops, and they created pester power.

See the OPC's complaint about the Paddle Pops website here

See the OPC's complaint about the Paddle Pops TV ad here

Smarties TV ad [ 24% ]

7 September 2010

The OPC complained that the ad breached the RCMI because it was directed primarily to children and Smarties are not a healthy dietary choice. The ad, which featured children having fun while helping artists create Smarties inspired artworks, was intended to appeal to children’s creativity, imagination and sense of fun, and was broadcast during The X Factor, which is watched by very high numbers of children.

Total 171 articles in this section.
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