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Total 174 articles in this section.
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Streets Paddle Pops website and TV ad [ 24% ]

10 February 2010

The OPC complained that the website and TV ad for the Streets Paddle Pop ‘Lick-a-prize’ promotion breached the AANA Food Code and Children’s Code because they featured a premium (the chance to win prizes), they were likely to mislead children to believe that the products being promoted were the prizes, they encouraged excessive consumption of Paddle Pops, and they created pester power.

See the OPC's complaint about the Paddle Pops website here

See the OPC's complaint about the Paddle Pops TV ad here

Junior Masterchef - Streets Magnum TV ad [ 24% ]

6 October 2010

The OPC complained that an ad for the Streets Magnum ‘1 in 6’ promotion breached the Australian Food and Grocery Council’s ‘Responsible Children’s Marketing Initiative’ (RCMI) because Magnum ice creams are not a healthy dietary choice, and the ad was shown during high rating programs for children, including Junior Masterchef, Modern Family, Talkin ‘Bout Your Generation and The Simpsons (all among the top ten rating programs for children aged 5-12 years).

Smarties TV ad [ 24% ]

7 September 2010

The OPC complained that the ad breached the RCMI because it was directed primarily to children and Smarties are not a healthy dietary choice. The ad, which featured children having fun while helping artists create Smarties inspired artworks, was intended to appeal to children’s creativity, imagination and sense of fun, and was broadcast during The X Factor, which is watched by very high numbers of children.

Chicken Treat TV ad [ 24% ]

28 January 2011


The OPC complained that the Chicken Treat TV ad breached the Quick Service Restaurant Initiative for Responsible Advertising and Marketing to Children’ (QSRI) because the ad was directed to children, and the advertised meal did not meet the QSRI nutrition criteria’. The advertisement featured a fun animated chicken promoting two chicken and chips meals for $10.

Donut King Ice Age 3 TV ad and website [ 24% ]

24 December 2009

The OPC complained that a TV ad and website promoting Donut King’s ‘Ice Age 3 combo’ (iced donut and fruit freeze drink) with a free Ice Age 3 wind-up toy breached the premium and pester power clauses of the AANA Food Code because the ad and website were dominated by promotion of the toy, and encouraged children to pester parents for the toy. The complaint also argued that the ad and website were contrary to prevailing community standards.

Hungry Jack’s Kids Club Meal (SpongeBob Square Pants) TV ad [ 24% ]

6 November 2009

The OPC complained that an ad for Hungry Jack’s Kids Club Meals, featuring Sponge Bob Square Pants characters and promoting free Sponge Bob Square Pants toys with meals, breached the ‘Quick Service Restaurant Initiative for Responsible Advertising and Marketing to Children’ (QSRI) because the ad was directed to children, and the advertised meal did not meet the QSRI nutrition criteria. The OPC also complained that the ad breached the ‘premiums’ and ‘personalities/characters’ clauses of the QSRI because it promoted free toys, and featured licensed characters.

Streets Paddle Pop TV ad [ 24% ]

10 February 2010

The OPC complained that a Streets Paddle Pops ad featured a premium (competition to win toys and holidays) and was likely to have been broadcast during C and P programs in breach of the Children's Television Standards (it was frequently broadcast in the mornings between 7am and 12 pm, including during school holidays).

The ad promoted a competition to win prizes by buying Paddle Pops and matching prize codes on Paddle Pops sticks. A voice-over spoken in a young child's voice encouraged children to ‘get licking' to win the prizes and one million free Paddle Pops on offer.

McDonald's Happy Meal TV ads [ 24% ]

6 November 2009

The OPC complained that McDonald’s ‘Box of Fun’ and ‘Cartoon Network’ TV ads for Happy Meals breached the QSRI because they were directed to children, and advertised products that did not meet the QSRI nutrition criteria (the particular products contained in the Happy Meals could not be identified from the ad, and therefore could not be said to meet the QSRI nutrition criteria). The OPC also complained that the ‘Cartoon Network’ ad also breached the premium clause of the QSRI because it advertised free toys with Happy Meals.

Hungry Jacks Kids Club Meal (Simpsons) TV ad [ 24% ]

27 January 2010

The OPC complained that an ad for Hungry Jack’s Kids Club Meals promoting free Simpsons couch toys with meals breached the ‘Quick Service Restaurant Initiative for Responsible Advertising and Marketing to Children’ (QSRI) because the ad was directed to children, and the advertised meal did not meet the QSRI nutrition criteria. The OPC noted that the Kids Club Meal had not changed since it was held by the ASB to breach the QSRI nutrition criteria. The OPC also complained that the ad breached the ‘premium’s and ‘personalities/characters’ clauses of the QSRI because it promoted free toys and featured licensed characters.

Kellogg’s LCM Bars TV ad [ 23% ]

24 December 2009

The OPC complained that an ad for Kellogg's LCM bars was directed to children and LCMs are not a healthy snack for children. The ad features primary school-aged children in a schoolyard trying to guess the flavour of an LCM bar. It shows excited children flocking to betting stations to place their bets, and cheering when a boy finally guesses the correct flavour. The ad depicts LCM bars as causing great excitement among young children, and as attracting the attention and envy of a child’s peers.

Total 174 articles in this section.
Pages: << Previous 1 . 2 . 3 . 4 . 5 . 6 . 7 . 8 . 9 . 10 . 11 . [12] . 13 . 14 . 15 . 16 . 17 . 18 Next >>