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Reports of the WHO Commission on Ending Childhood Obesity [ 23% ]

1 December 2015

 

The OPC's submission to the Interim Report of the WHO Commission on Ending Childhood Obesity welcomed the report but encouraged the Commission to strengthen its position by:

  • highlighting the vital need for WHO and government led policy and regulatory reform;
  • recognising the problems with industry self-regulation and need for governments to manage inherent conflicts of interest;
  • more strongly recognising the social and environmental drivers of overweight and obesity (and the strategies to address them);
  • advocating for the elevation of the WHO Set of Recommendations on the Marketing of Foods and Non-alcoholic Beverages to Children to code or preferably convention status, and/or advocating for a framework convention on food, diets, weight and non-communicable disease; and
  • having regard to the monitoring criteria and progress of the International Network for Obesity/NCD Research, Monitoring and Support (INFORMAS) and the accounting framework recently outlined by Swinburn et al in the Second Lancet Series on Obesity (February, 2015).
 
The WHO Commission on Ending Childhood Obesity released its Draft Final Report in September 2015. The Draft Final Report is available here

The OPC's responses to the WHO's online consultation questions welcomed the Draft Final Report which included a strengthened focus on prevention, recognition of the importance of government leadership and greater specificity in its recommended Policy Actions. The OPC's responses also highlighting some ways the Final Report could be further strengthened.
 

 

Comprehensive Review of Food Labelling Law and Policy [ 23% ]

14 May 2010

The Comprehensive Review of Food Labelling Law and Policy (2011) was undertaken at the request of the Australian Ministerial Council, with the agreement of the Council of Australian Governments.

The OPC's first submission was in response to the Food Regulation Standing Committee's (FRSC) Consultation Paper for a Front of Pack Labelling Policy Guideline. The OPC recommended that the policy guideline should support the introduction of a uniform, mandatory and easy to use front of pack labelling system, preferably a traffic light labelling system.

The OPC's second submission was in response to the review panel's issues consultation paper. It outlined a number of key recommendations for changes to food labelling law and policy to encourage healthier patterns of eating in the Australian population, including:

  • Mandatory traffic light labelling on the front of food packages, in fast food outlets and in food retail outlets in public institutions (e.g. hospitals and schools)
  • Restrictions on use of nutrition claims (e.g. high fibre) in food advertising and on packaging to foods that meet general nutrition profile criteria (to ensure claims can only be made about foods that are healthy overall)
  • Requirements for disclosure of nutrition information in food advertisements
  • Establishment of a national food labelling enforcement authority
  • Development of overarching food labelling principles, and detailed food labelling interpretation guidelines

The Review Panel adopted a number of the OPC's recommendations for food labelling reforms (see Labelling Logic - Review of Food Labelling Law and Policy Report). In particular, the Review Panel recommended the introduction of a traffic light labelling system on the front of food packs and fast food menus (recommendations 50 - 54), the introduction of mandatory energy labelling on fast food menus and vending machines (recommendation 18),  requirement that all foods that make nutrition claims must meet general nutrition profile criteria (recommendation 20b) and establishment of a food labelling bureau (recommendation 57- 61).

The OPC's third submission was to inform the Commonwealth and State and Territory governments' response to the Labelling Logic report. It encouraged Australian governments to support the adoption of the recommendations in the report, particularly recommendations 50 - 54, 18, 20b and 57-61. It also made some additional suggestions to strengthen the effectiveness of, and compliance with, any traffic light labelling scheme.

OPC urges Senate to support junk ad bill [ 8% ]

21 November 2011

The Obesity Policy Coalition (OPC) has urged all Federal MPs to support a Bill to be introduced into the Senate tomorrow to protect children from junk food advertising.

Health groups release landmark blueprint to tackle key driver of childhood obesity [ 8% ]

9 May 2011

The Obesity Policy Coalition has today released the first Australian plan for legislation that offers real protection for children from unhealthy food advertising – one of the key drivers of childhood obesity.

Public supports tougher regulation of unhealthy food advertising [ 8% ]

16 November 2011

93% of South Australians agree the time has come to put a stop to unhealthy food producers from targeting kids through glitzy television ads and marketing ploys.

Australians 180,000 tonnes overweight & gaining 5,000 tonnes per year [ 7% ]

8 July 2014

The Obesity Policy Coalition called for a national coordinated action plan to address the obesity issue, following the release of a new "state of the nation" report by Roy Morgan Research this morning.

Salt, fat and energy reduction targets only valuable if monitored [ 7% ]

10 October 2012

The government and the Australian public should be wary of the Australian Food and Grocery Council's (AFGC) Healthier Australia Commitment, which was launched today, according to the Obesity Policy Coalition (OPC).

Fanta loses fizz: Ad and app pulled for directly marketing to kids [ 7% ]

15 July 2015

A Fanta television advertisement and mobile phone app have been pulled after the Advertising Standards Board found they broke the rules by directly marketing an unhealthy drink to children.

Greens Commit to Ban on Junk Food Advertising to Children [ 7% ]

9 August 2013

As part of a policy announcement, the Greens have confirmed they will target junk food advertisers as part of a preventative health plan to tackle childhood obesity.

Total 44 articles in this section.
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