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Free TV Australia's review of the Commercial Television Industry Code of Practice [ 100% ]

1 April 2015

The OPC's submission focuses upon the role that the Commercial Television Industry Code of Practice (CTICP) should play in restricting unhealthy food advertising to children.

In particular, it expresses concern about Free TV Australia's proposal to remove the only clauses in the CTICP that relate to unhealthy food advertising to children. It submits that at the very least, the current restrictions that apply to unhealthy food advertising to children should be retained and strengthened. Preferably, and to meaningfully reduce children's exposure to unhealthy food advertising, the OPC proposes that comprehensive amendments should be made to address the volume of unhealthy food advertising on television and the marketing techniques most commonly used to reach children.

If a co-regulatory approach capable of protecting children from this type of advertising cannot be achieved, a regulatory approach will be required.

Free TV Australia released its new Commercial Television Industry Code of Practice on 10 November 2015, which removed the clauses relating to unhealthy food advertising to children. The new code is available here

Hungry Jack’s Kids Club Meal and McDonald’s Happy Meal [ 94% ]

19 February 2010

The OPC complained that ads for McDonalds Happy Meals and Hungry Jack's Kids Club Meals were broadcast during C and P programs (Totally Wild) and featured premiums (free toys) in breach of the Children's Television Standards.

The McDonalds 'Stuff to Know' ad for Happy Meals promoted Ben 10 Alien Force Action Band toys and Little Miss Pet Shop Accessory Kits with meals. The Hungry Jack's ad for its Kids Club Meals promoted free Simpsons couch toys with meals.

Fanta loses fizz: Ad and app pulled for directly marketing to kids [ 67% ]

15 July 2015

A Fanta television advertisement and mobile phone app have been pulled after the Advertising Standards Board found they broke the rules by directly marketing an unhealthy drink to children.

Milo 'Hey Gilly' CD-Rom TV ad [ 57% ]

18 May 2007

The OPC complained to Network Ten and the Australian Communications and Media Authority that an ad for Milo, which featured Adam Gilchrist and promoted a free 'Hey Gilly' cricket CD-Rom, breached the Commercial Television Industry Code of Practice and the Children's Television Standards because it was dominated by a premium offer (the free CD-Rom).

See the OPC's complaint to Network Ten here

See the OPC's complaint to ACMA here

Streets Paddle Pop TV ad [ 53% ]

10 February 2010

The OPC complained that a Streets Paddle Pops ad featured a premium (competition to win toys and holidays) and was likely to have been broadcast during C and P programs in breach of the Children's Television Standards (it was frequently broadcast in the mornings between 7am and 12 pm, including during school holidays).

The ad promoted a competition to win prizes by buying Paddle Pops and matching prize codes on Paddle Pops sticks. A voice-over spoken in a young child's voice encouraged children to ‘get licking' to win the prizes and one million free Paddle Pops on offer.

Public supports tougher regulation of unhealthy food advertising [ 51% ]

16 November 2011

93% of South Australians agree the time has come to put a stop to unhealthy food producers from targeting kids through glitzy television ads and marketing ploys.

Walt Disney's junk food ad ban exposes TV's influence on kids [ 39% ]

7 June 2012

Walt Disney has announced it will institute a junk food advertising ban on programs for children across its networks.

Health groups release landmark blueprint to tackle key driver of childhood obesity [ 32% ]

9 May 2011

The Obesity Policy Coalition has today released the first Australian plan for legislation that offers real protection for children from unhealthy food advertising – one of the key drivers of childhood obesity.

Health coalition applauds Tasmania for taking the lead on junk food ads [ 28% ]

10 May 2011

The Obesity Policy Coalition has applauded Tasmanian Minister for Consumer Protection, Nick McKim, for taking the lead in protecting children from junk food advertising by calling for an investigation today.

Total 46 articles in this section.
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