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Hungry Jacks Kids Club Meal (Simpsons) TV ad [ 77% ]

27 January 2010

The OPC complained that an ad for Hungry Jack’s Kids Club Meals promoting free Simpsons couch toys with meals breached the ‘Quick Service Restaurant Initiative for Responsible Advertising and Marketing to Children’ (QSRI) because the ad was directed to children, and the advertised meal did not meet the QSRI nutrition criteria. The OPC noted that the Kids Club Meal had not changed since it was held by the ASB to breach the QSRI nutrition criteria. The OPC also complained that the ad breached the ‘premium’s and ‘personalities/characters’ clauses of the QSRI because it promoted free toys and featured licensed characters.

Chicken Treat TV ad [ 77% ]

28 January 2011


The OPC complained that the Chicken Treat TV ad breached the Quick Service Restaurant Initiative for Responsible Advertising and Marketing to Children’ (QSRI) because the ad was directed to children, and the advertised meal did not meet the QSRI nutrition criteria’. The advertisement featured a fun animated chicken promoting two chicken and chips meals for $10.

Kellogg Nutri-Grain Iron Man TV ads [ 77% ]

16 June 2009

Kellogg’s Nutri-Grain ‘iron man’ TV ads featured a young man growing up into an iron man, and claimed that “as part of a balanced diet and regular exercise, Nutri-Grain has what it takes to help build your son into an Iron Man.” A further ad featured an iron man exercising in extreme conditions, and claimed that Nutri-Grain has “carbos for energy, protein for muscle development and calcium for bone strength...” The OPC complained that the ads were misleading and deceptive in breach of the AANA Food Code and the AANA Code of Ethics, because they created an overall impression that Nutri-Grain is healthy, good for, and beneficial to the active lifestyle of, children and young people (when in fact it is high in sugar and salt and low in fibre  and not a healthy breakfast cereal for children and young people).

Kellogg’s LCM Bars TV ad [ 77% ]

24 December 2009

The OPC complained that an ad for Kellogg's LCM bars was directed to children and LCMs are not a healthy snack for children. The ad features primary school-aged children in a schoolyard trying to guess the flavour of an LCM bar. It shows excited children flocking to betting stations to place their bets, and cheering when a boy finally guesses the correct flavour. The ad depicts LCM bars as causing great excitement among young children, and as attracting the attention and envy of a child’s peers.

Hungry Jack’s Kids Club Meals - Golden Compass TV ad [ 77% ]

14 February 2008

The OPC complained that the ad breached the premium provision of the AANA Food Code because it was directed to children and promoted free Golden Compass animal character toys with Kids Club Meals, and that it breached the pester power provision of the Code because it encouraged children to pester parents to take them to Hungry Jack's in order to buy the meal with the toys.

McDonald's Happy Meal TV ads [ 77% ]

6 November 2009

The OPC complained that McDonald’s ‘Box of Fun’ and ‘Cartoon Network’ TV ads for Happy Meals breached the QSRI because they were directed to children, and advertised products that did not meet the QSRI nutrition criteria (the particular products contained in the Happy Meals could not be identified from the ad, and therefore could not be said to meet the QSRI nutrition criteria). The OPC also complained that the ‘Cartoon Network’ ad also breached the premium clause of the QSRI because it advertised free toys with Happy Meals.

Hungry Jack’s Kids Club Meal and McDonald’s Happy Meal [ 76% ]

19 February 2010

The OPC complained that ads for McDonalds Happy Meals and Hungry Jack's Kids Club Meals were broadcast during C and P programs (Totally Wild) and featured premiums (free toys) in breach of the Children's Television Standards.

The McDonalds 'Stuff to Know' ad for Happy Meals promoted Ben 10 Alien Force Action Band toys and Little Miss Pet Shop Accessory Kits with meals. The Hungry Jack's ad for its Kids Club Meals promoted free Simpsons couch toys with meals.

Free TV Australia's review of the Commercial Television Industry Code of Practice [ 75% ]

1 April 2015

The OPC's submission focuses upon the role that the Commercial Television Industry Code of Practice (CTICP) should play in restricting unhealthy food advertising to children.

In particular, it expresses concern about Free TV Australia's proposal to remove the only clauses in the CTICP that relate to unhealthy food advertising to children. It submits that at the very least, the current restrictions that apply to unhealthy food advertising to children should be retained and strengthened. Preferably, and to meaningfully reduce children's exposure to unhealthy food advertising, the OPC proposes that comprehensive amendments should be made to address the volume of unhealthy food advertising on television and the marketing techniques most commonly used to reach children.

If a co-regulatory approach capable of protecting children from this type of advertising cannot be achieved, a regulatory approach will be required.

Free TV Australia released its new Commercial Television Industry Code of Practice on 10 November 2015, which removed the clauses relating to unhealthy food advertising to children. The new code is available here

Policy brief: Food advertising to children [ 71% ]

There is substantial evidence that food and beverage advertising influences the types of foods children desire, demand and consume. Advertising of unhealthy food to children also undermines healthy eating messages from parents, schools and government, affects children’s ability to establish healthy eating patterns, and is likely to contribute to overweight and obesity in children.

The Obesity Policy Coalition recommends that legislation should be introduced (by federal and/or state governments) to prohibit television advertising of unhealthy food on television at times when a significant number of children are likely to be watching - on weekdays from 6–9am and 4–9 pm, and on weekends and school holidays from 6am–12pm and 4–9pm.

Legislation should also prohibit all other forms of promotion of unhealthy food to children, including via print, radio, internet, cinema, outdoor media, direct marketing (email, SMS or direct mail), product packaging, or point of sale promotions.

Total 46 articles in this section.
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