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Total 46 articles in this section.
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Charade of ‘responsible’ junk food ads worsening [ 69% ]

1 December 2015

A new Obesity Policy Coalition report calls for action to protect children from junk food marketing, as profit-hungry food advertisers exploit loopholes in self-regulatory codes. The report, End the Charade, highlights the failures of self-regulation by the food and advertising industries, exposing sneaky tactics that are resulting in children being bombarded with junk food advertising.

Greens Commit to Ban on Junk Food Advertising to Children [ 62% ]

9 August 2013

As part of a policy announcement, the Greens have confirmed they will target junk food advertisers as part of a preventative health plan to tackle childhood obesity.

Health groups release landmark blueprint to tackle key driver of childhood obesity [ 58% ]

9 May 2011

The Obesity Policy Coalition has today released the first Australian plan for legislation that offers real protection for children from unhealthy food advertising – one of the key drivers of childhood obesity.

Health groups say parents & kids will benefit from ACT Greens' junk food ad commitment [ 54% ]

12 September 2012

The OPC has backed an election commitment announced today by the ACT Greens to restrict junk food advertising directed at children. The proposed plan would mean junk food advertising was no longer able to be shown on TV when large numbers of children are watching.

Opinion piece in Croakey - How long can the Australian Food and Grocery Council peddle junk claims? [ 49% ]

29 June 2011

Croakey opinion piece - AFGC claims about junk food advertising and self-regulation

It's a Knockout! ACMA report delivers blow to self-regulation [ 45% ]

7 December 2011

A report released today by the media watchdog, the Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA), further highlights the inadequacy of self-regulation of junk food advertising, according to Jane Martin, senior policy adviser for the Obesity Policy Coalition.

Uncle Toby’s Roll-Ups ‘Fruba News’ email and website [ 44% ]

18 May 2007

Uncle Tobys sent an email newsletter promoting Roll-Ups to children who had registered on the Roll-Ups ‘Frubalia' website. The newsletter and website told children to 'ask mum or dad' to buy Roll-Ups to enter competition to win prizes, including a Playstation, Sony camera and iPod.

The OPC complained to the ASB that the email and website breached clauses 3.5 (pester power) and 3.7 (premiums) of the AANA Food Code (because they told children to ask their parents to buy the product, and because they were dominated by a premium offer (entry to the competition and chance to win prizes).

Smarties website [ 32% ]

27 September 2010

The OPC complained that the Smarties website breached the RCMI because it was directed primarily to children and because Smarties are not a healthy dietary choice. The brightly-coloured website displays images of Smarties and features a colouring-in competition open only to children aged 3–10. See http://www.smarties-australia.com.au/

Letter to The Australian: Parents need support [ 30% ]

19 May 2008

Letter to The Australian

Total 46 articles in this section.
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