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Peters Fandangles Ice Creams

26 November 2014

Summary

The OPC complained that a series of TV ads for Peters Fandangles Ice-creams (Choc Shmallow, Fairy Floss and Whoopie Cookie) contravened "prevailing community standards" in breach of the Australian Association of National Advertisers (AANA) Code of Ethics.

The OPC argued that the advertisements promoted food products to children that should not form a regular part of a healthy diet and that peer reviewed and published evidence shows this marketing practice contravenes Prevailing Community Standard on this issue.

Outcome

COMPLAINTS DISMISSED

The ASB found that the Choc Shmallow advertisement would appeal to a range of age groups and were not directed primarily to children. It stated that even if Peters Fandangles Ice-cream is an unhealthy product (Peters argued that it is classified as ‘Amber’ rated under NSW canteen guidelines) advertising an unhealthy product does not of itself contravene prevailing community standards. Read the ASB's decision on the Choc Shmallow ad.

The ASB found that the Fairly Floss advertisement was for a product directed primarily to children but that the advertisement did not encourage or promote unhealthy eating habits in breach of the AANA Children’s Code. It also found that advertising an unhealthy children’s product does not of itself contravene prevailing community standards.  Read the ASB's decision on the Fairy Floss ad.

The ASB found that the Whoopie Cookie advertisement was directed primarily to children and for a product directed primarily to children. However as above, it found that the advertisement did not encourage or promote unhealthy eating habits in breach of the AANA Children’s Code. It also found that advertising an unhealthy children’s product does not of itself contravene prevailing community standards.  Read the ASB's decision on the Whoopie Cookie ad.